Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy

 

-The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, more commonly known as the Clery Act, is contained (along with other security-related disclosure requirements) in section 485 of the Higher Education Act, codified at 20 U.S.C. § 1092. It requires all postsecondary education institutions to keep records and report annually on the nature, date, time, and place of crimes occurring on campus, including hate crimes. It also prescribes a number of security-related protocols for emergency response procedures, timely notifications for on-campus crimes, etc.

Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute’s commitment to safety and security includes:

  • Providing a secure and crime free environment for students, faculty and
  • Performing regular evaluation of security
  • Monitoring and following up on each crime reported at a Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute location.

We believe student, faculty, and staff behavior which promotes security awareness is important in all aspects of our lives and we encourage all students, faculty and staff to accept responsibility for their own security as well as the security of other members of the Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute’s community. As you read the following report, comments, questions or concerns may be addressed to: Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute Attn: Director 3709 Hempstead Tnpk Levittown, NY 11756

STATEMENT OF CURRENT POLICIES REGARDING PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS AND OTHERS TO REPORT CRIMINAL ACTIONS AND POLICES CONCERNING THE INSTITUTION’S RESPONSE TO SUCH REPORTS:

Students, faculty or staff who wish to report criminal actions, should immediately contact the academic administrator or other responsible supervisory personnel at their campus. The criminal action should then be immediately reported by students, faculty or staff to the local authorities for assistance and /or investigation. Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute is completed with the assistance of the person reporting the criminal action. The report should be filed as soon as possible with the Director who will follow up on the report personally or assign responsibility to another appropriate administrator to follow up and report on the outcome as well as any preventative or other actions taken to ensure the safety and security of all staff, faculty and students.

PREPARING THE ANNUAL DISCLOSURE

The Director, serving as the campus security authority (CSA) for the school, has the responsibility of gathering the data used to prepare the annual campus crime statistics report. Campus crime data is gathered the same day that it is reported. The data is obtained from reports made to local law enforcement. Crimes are counted in the disclosure based upon the crime having been reported, not whether there was a conviction. Data is obtained annually from local law enforcement and compared with the data gathered at the school. The resulting data is used to prepare the annual crime statistics report. The ASR is published and distributed by October 1 of each year to current students and employees. A notice of the ASR’s availability is also provided to prospective students and employees, with a notice that a paper copy is available upon request.

REPORTABLE OFFENSES UNDER THE CLERY ACT

The Clery Act requires reporting on the following offenses:

  • murder;
  • manslaughter (non-negligent)
  • sex offenses, forcible and non-forcible;
  • robbery;
  • aggravated assault;
  • burglary;
  • motor vehicle theft;
  • arson;
  • arrests, or persons referred for campus disciplinary action for liquor law violations;
  • arrests, or persons referred for campus disciplinary action for drug-related violations;
    • arrests, or persons referred for campus disciplinary action for weapons possession; and
    • hate crimes, [which for Clery Act purposes include any crime listed in the preceding points and, as of 2008, larceny-theft; simple assault; intimidation; and destruction, damage, or vandalism of property in which the victim is intentionally selected because of his or her actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or ]

*On March 7, 2013, President Obama signed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). Among other provisions, this law amended the Clery Act to require postsecondary institutions to include in their Annual Campus Security Report all instances of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking; and instances of gender identity and national origin crimes which fall under the category of Hate Crimes. These new reportable items must be included in the ASR released by October 1, 2015.

GEOGRAPHICAL AREA

The Clery Act requires each institution to disclose crime statistics that occur on three types of property: campus, non-campus buildings or property, and public property areas. “Campus” is defined as buildings or property owned or controlled by the institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in a manner related to the institution’s educational purpose. It also includes property in that contiguous area owned by the institution but controlled by another person, if that property is used by students and supports institutional purposes (e.g. a food or retail vendor). Branch campuses and geographically disconnected administrative divisions or schools would be considered separate campuses for the purposes of reporting. “Public property” is property that is located within the same reasonably contiguous geographic areas of the campus, like a sidewalk, street or public parking lot, that is adjacent to a facility owned or controlled by the institution for purposes related to the institution’s educational purposes. Crimes occurring on “public property” must also be reported in the crime statistics. A “non-campus building or property” is one that is owned or controlled by a school recognized student organization, or one that is owned or controlled by the institution and used by students or by the institution for education-related purposes and that is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the campus. Crimes occurring on “non-campus property” must be reported. However, incidents occurring on public property adjacent to “non-campus buildings or property” do not have to be included. Our institution does not have such property in this category for which we must report.

TIMELY CAMPUS WARNINGS or ALERTS

A timely warning to the campus community is distributed regarding any of the above listed crimes (see Reportable Offenses under the Clery Act) which are deemed to represent a threat to the students and employees, and which are reported to campus officials or to local police agencies. The campus crime alert is issued in a manner that is timely and will aid in the prevention of similar crimes. The manner of dissemination to alert the campus community may include one or more of the following methods: e-mail, voice mail, and text messages. Campus officials may decide to issue an alert about a crime occurring off-campus but in a location frequented by students, even though such a crime would not be included in the annual report.

 STATEMENT OF CURRENT POLICIES CONCERNING CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT AND POLICIES THAT ENCOURAGE PROMPT REPORTING OF ALL CAMPUS CRIME TO THE CAMPUS POLICE AND LOCAL POLICE

Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute is essentially a non-residential School, and does not have a campus police force. Therefore, all crimes are reported to local authorities as described in the first section regarding policies and procedures to report crimes. The School Accident / Incident Report Form (referenced above) may be requested from the Director to assist in the description and recording of an incident of crime or emergency.

Voluntary confidential reporting: As Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute is essentially a non-residential School, and does not have a campus police force all crimes must be reported to local authorities. Local law enforcement will allow a victim or witness to report crime on a voluntary and confidential basis.

Crime Reporting

Efforts are made to inform members of the campus community on a timely basis about campus crime and crime-related issues. These efforts include the following:

  • Daily Crime Log – Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute maintains a daily crime log, which is available for review within two days of request except in cases such as where disclosure of such information may be prohibited by law, jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim,
  • Crime Alerts – Crime Alerts are published when a crime occurs on or near campus that potentially threatens the campus community. The crime alerts are distributed in a variety of methods, depending upon the incident. (See Timely Campus Warnings )

How to Report Crimes on Campus

Students and employees are cautioned never to attempt to apprehend or pursue a suspected criminal. Crimes or suspected criminals should be reported to the CSA or other designated staff member or, if appropriate, to 911. Immediately report any crimes or suspicious activity by:

  • Calling the Director
  • Stopping by the Director’s Office in person

If you have any doubts about whether to report something that has occurred, report it. Victims of, or witnesses to, crimes may disclose them on a voluntary, confidential basis to the CSA, which can then determine whether the event constitutes a crime that has to be collected and statistically reported. Your cooperation in timely reporting assists the school in issuing equally timely warnings to the campus community. All crimes must be reported immediately. Always use your eyes, ears, and telephone to keep campus officials advised of what you see and hear. Call the Director when you see:

  • Strangers loitering in office areas, hallways, classrooms, or lounge areas,
  • Unsecured doors or windows in campus buildings that are supposed to be locked
  • Anyone tampering with a motor vehicle or loitering in a parking lot
  • Persons publicly displaying a weapon
  • Persons loitering in dark or secluded areas
  • Suspicious persons carrying articles, equipment, luggage, or other packages out of campus buildings

Crime is a serious problem with no easy solutions. Therefore, all members of the school campus community are encouraged to assist one another by taking responsibility for personal safety and assisting with the security needs of others. While school staff and security measures may offer assistance regarding safety and security concerns, ultimately the primary responsibility for your personal safety rests with you.

Safety Tips

  • Stay alert of your surroundings, wherever you
  • If you feel uncomfortable in a place, leave right
  • Keep eyes and ears open, hands
  • Choose busy streets and avoid going through deserted
  • At night, walk in well-lit areas whenever
  • Try not to walk or jog alone. Take a friend or walk in
  • Avoid carrying large sums of
  • When in public spaces, keep valuable items including jewelry, mobile phones and wallets out of sight.
  • Carry a pepper or mace spray as a precautionary
  • Avoid returning to campus after dark, or walk in groups to and from
  • Communicate suspicious behavior immediately to a staff or

A STATEMENT OF PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEESSECURITY, PERSONAL SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION

 Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute provides information on personal safety and crime prevention. The Director’s office has a directory of services that are available, within the community, to assist those who have suffered from a criminal act. These services are usually free and are provided by the community. During the orientation of students, faculty and staff, procedures are outlined to cover the reporting of all criminal acts.

Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act

The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act that became effective October 27, 2002 requires eligible institutions participating in the Title IV Federal Student Aid programs to issue a statement advising the campus community where the State law enforcement agency information concerning registered sex offenders/predators may be obtained. Sex offenders are required to be registered according to the State law in the State in which they reside and are also required to notify appropriate State officials of each postsecondary school at which the offender is employed or is a student. Any such offender is also required to give notice to the appropriate State authorities of any changes in enrollment or employment status at the postsecondary school. In the State of New York information concerning registered sex offenders and predators may be obtained from: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services

http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/nsor/

  Information is also available in the United States Department of Justice national sex offender registry at http://www.nsopw.gov/Core/Portal.aspx

A STATEMENT OF CURRENT POLICIES CONCERNING THE SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION PROGRAM AND THE PROCEDURES THAT ARE FOLLOWED

The new Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act of 2013 (SAVE Act) requires schools to educate students, staff, and faculty on the prevention of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. As part of Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute’s compliance with the SAVE Act requirements for prevention and awareness programs that address the specified areas above, the institution has several relevant brochures available in the Director’s Office. These brochures are from nationally recognized organizations and include awareness and preventive information. These brochures also include help hotlines related to these specific topics. Additionally, Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute has a sexual assault prevention program that includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Use of a “Buddy System” when walking to parked cars at night
  • Leaving the building in a group when classes are dismissed
  • If an assault occurs, notify the Director immediately
  • Do not disturb the crime scene
  • Notify local law enforcement officials
  • Secure counseling for the victim, or offer a referral to appropriate entities that provide applicable counseling
  • Change the academic schedule if victim requests
  • Disciplinary actions include dismissal from the School

As part of the effort to provide an environment conducive to the school’s mission, the following services relating to sexual assault are provided at Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute. The school provides educational programs (referenced above) to enhance awareness of sexual assault and the condition that fosters this offense on school campuses.  The school undertakes efforts to safeguard the rights and interest of the survivor and pursues sanctions against the perpetrator(s) of sexual assault. The school official will, upon request, arrange transportation to a hospital for treatment and evidence collection; provide notification to an off-campus support and counseling service; provide assistance in contacting the appropriate law enforcement agency as applicable. Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute does not tolerate sexual assault against females or males, whether committed by a stranger or by an acquaintance.  The school attempts to protect  members of the school community, including visitors,  from sexual  assaults  and offers any student,  faculty or staff member who survives a sexual assault that occurs within the context of the school community the support necessary to enable them to continue to pursue their academic  or career goals.

Definitions

For the purposes of this Policy, “sexual assault” is defined as any sexual act perpetrated upon a person without their consent, where the assailant uses physical force, threat, coercion or intimidation to overpower or control the victim; where the victim fears that they or another person will be injured or otherwise harmed if they do not submit; where the victim is prevented from resisting due to the influence of alcohol or other drugs; or where consent is otherwise not freely given. A sexual act includes, but is not limited to, actual or attempted intercourse, sexual touching, fondling, and groping. Sexual assault is classified as “rape” when vaginal, anal or oral intercourse takes place without consent. This includes penetration by a foreign object. Sex crimes, including but not limited to sexual assaults and rapes, represent violations of criminal and civil law, and constitute serious breaches of student or employee conduct as well. All parties engaging in sexual activity must be based upon explicit consent among the parties. Verbal communications of non-consent, non-verbal acts of resistance or rejection, or mental impairment of the victim due to any cause including the victim’s use of alcohol or drugs may constitute lack of consent. The use of alcohol or drugs will not be accepted as an explanation for the actions of any individual charged with a violation of this policy. Any individual who has been sexually assaulted, including date or acquaintance rape, is strongly encouraged to report the incident to the local police (if off-campus), school officials described below, faculty or staff members as well as any civil authorities that an individual deems appropriate. Staff members are trained to assist and support victims in notifying appropriate law enforcement authorities regarding such crimes, if requested by the victim.

Suggestions to Reduce Risk:

  • There is strength in numbers or group dates. Go to parties or clubs with a friend and be responsible for each other. Don’t split up. Have a preplanned signal to let your friend know that you want to leave or need
  • Control your alcohol; don’t let it control you. Drink responsibly or not at all, especially on first
  • No substance
  • Know your limits. It’s never too late to say “no.” Don’t be embarrassed or ashamed to say “no” or ask someone to stop. It is your
  • Verbalize your expectations. Be up front. Talk about sexual boundaries. A potentially embarrassing conversation could save you from a traumatic situation.
  • Trust your gut instinct. Guard your personal space. If someone makes you uncomfortable, remove yourself from the
  • Believe in yourself. Know your rights. Women do not ask to be raped any more than a man with money in his pocket is asking to be robbed. You are in charge of your body and you can say “NO”.
  • End the night early if your date becomes drunk or abusive. No one deserves physical or emotional

Response to Reports of Sexual Assault

The school is committed to creating an environment that both promotes and assists in prompt reporting of sexual assault, and to providing compassionate support services for survivors. Students who are the victims of campus-related sexual assault are entitled to certain rights. These rights include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The survivor has the right to have their claims treated seriously and to be treated with
  • The survivor has the right to be informed of their options with regard to notifying law enforcement authorities and to be assisted in notifying such authorities if they so choose. Because the school recognizes that a sexual assault is more than an assault on an individual’s body, but is also an attack on the individual’s dignity and sense of self, the school is committed to ensuring that the decision to take action against the accused rests solely with the There may be circumstances, however, depending upon the status of the alleged assailant and the seriousness of the offense, in which the school must take action to protect the survivor or the campus community. Federal law requires that the school provide the campus community with timely notice of certain reported crimes and/or acts the institution believes represent a threat to members of the campus community.
  • The survivor has the right to be free from undue coercion of any kind from the school’s personnel. Such coercion includes but is not limited to pressuring the survivor to report, not to report, or to under report a sexual assault; suggesting that the survivor somehow contributed to or assumed the risk of being sexually assaulted; or suggesting that the survivor or the school would incur unwanted publicity or humiliation by reporting the sexual
  • Student survivors may choose to change academic arrangements, if such changes are reasonably available, without financial or academic penalty. For assistance in exploring options for a change in academic situations, contact should be made with the

If you are Sexually Assaulted

  • Get to a safe
  • Call the police as soon as it is safe to do so by dialing 9-1-1.

Reporting the Assault

Students who believe that they are victims of a sexual assault should contact at least one of the following school officials.

  • Director
  • School Owner

School faculty, staff members or campus visitors who believe they are victims of a sexual assault should contact at least one of the following school officials:

  • Director
  • Other Manager/Supervisor
  • School Owner

Individuals who have been raped or sexually assaulted should try to preserve all physical evidence. They should  not wash,  use the  toilet, or change clothing,  if doing  so  can be avoided. If oral contact took place, one should not smoke, eat, drink, or brush one’s teeth. If one changes clothes, all clothing worn at the time of the attack should be placed in a paper bag, not plastic. Medical attention should be sought as soon as possible to assess any physical injuries, provide appropriate medical treatment, and collect important evidence in the event legal action is taken. In cases of alleged sexual assault, the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during campus disciplinary proceedings, and both the accuser and the accused shall be informed of the outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding brought alleging a sexual assault. An accused perpetrator of sexual assault, if determined to be responsible of the accused sexual assault, may be dismissed from the Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute immediately. The nature of sexual assault, particularly when perpetrated by an acquaintance, makes it difficult for many survivors to report their experience.  For this reason, the local Shelters and Women’s Service Centers are primary places where individuals may seek assistance in complete confidentiality.

Important Phone Numbers

  Safe Horizon http://www.safehorizon.org (800) 621-HOPE (4673) National Center for Victims of Crime Hotline: 1-800-FYI-CALL (800-394-2255)

A STATEMENT OF PROGRAMS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES RELATED TO CAMPUS SECURITY, PERSONAL SAFETY, AND CRIME PREVENTION

The Director’s Office has a directory of services that are available, within the community, to assist those who have suffered from a criminal act. These services are usually free and are provided by the community. During the orientation of students, faculty and staff, procedures are outlined to cover the reporting of all criminal acts.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES – STATEMENT OF POLICY

Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute has in place at our campus facility a campus response protocol. In an emergency or a dangerous situation, upon confirmation with the Director, or designee, of the need for mass notification, the Director, or designee, will without delay, taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of the responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Emergency or dangerous situations may include, but are not limited to, gas leaks, tornadoes, contagious viruses, etc.

EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

In the event of an emergency or a dangerous situation that poses an immediate threat to the campus community, Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute may utilize some or all of its mass notification capabilities to notify its campus community. These capabilities may include e-mail, voice mail and text messages to alert the campus community The Director, or designee, will simultaneously use the local means at his/ her disposal to notify the campus students, staff and faculty of the situation, as well as disseminate pertinent information to relevant public entities. This emergency notification requirement does not replace the timely warning requirement described earlier. They differ in that the timely warning applies only to Clery reportable crimes while the emergency notification requirement addresses a much wider range of threats (i.e., gas leaks, tornadoes, contagious viruses, etc.). However, an institution that follows its emergency notification procedures is not required to issue a timely warning based on the same circumstances but must provide adequate follow-up information to the community as needed. Training, exercises and tests will be conducted annually by management on the campus level and by the individuals relevant to mass notification. Management will document each test conducted by all relevant entities.

Student Must Know – Emergency Information

The campus takes various precautionary measures to protect the students, staff, faculty, and campus visitors. Nevertheless, unavoidable emergencies may occur in extreme situations. Therefore, each campus has a Campus Response Team (CRT) that implements and oversees the campus response to a crisis situation. The CRT receives training in dealing with crisis situations and will primarily direct the immediate response to a crisis situation until the arrival of law enforcement and emergency response personnel. In order to make this program effective, students are to familiarize themselves with the following emergency procedures. Nothing herein precludes any student, staff or faculty from contacting the appropriate authorities directly in the event they feel in threat of physical harm or imminent danger. *** In case of emergency – dial 911*** Department of Homeland Security:

“Active shooter awareness- options for consideration” http://www.dhs.gov/video/options-consideration-active-shooter-training-video

Student Emergency Responses There is potential for students to be involved in a variety of emergency situations for which appropriate actions must be taken. These possible situations include incidences that may require emergency evacuation, emergency lockdown, external lockdown, or to shelter in place.

Emergency Evacuation Evacuation is the movement of campus occupants from a dangerous or potentially dangerous location to a safe location. There are two types of evacuation: fire evacuation and non-fire evacuation. Fire evacuation:

  • Evacuation is mandatory when a fire alarm is
  • Follow authorized personnel’s (e.g., faculty, staff, or fire department personnel, etc.) instructions if given.
  • Do not use the
  • Assist people with disabilities, if
  • Ensure all doors and windows are closed as a room and building are evacuated. (Do not lock doors.)
  • Do not attempt to reenter the facility unless and until directed to do so by authorized
  • Evacuate to a safe distance and location from the building affected, away from fire hydrants, fire lanes, and not under power

Non-fire evacuation

  • A non-fire evacuation will be initiated by campus
  • Follow CRT instructions if
  • Do not use the
  • Assist people with disabilities if
  • Do not attempt to reenter the facility unless directed to do so

Emergency Lockdown Emergency Lockdown is used to dramatically and rapidly enhance the level of security of the campus. By locking all exterior, interior and classroom doors, staff can make it more difficult for dangerous person(s) in the vicinity of the campus and in the campus to gain access to staff and students;

  • Lock or barricade doors of classroom and internal student areas of
  • Close blinds, turn off
  • Remain quiet and out of
  • If gunshots are heard, lie on the floor and try to use available resources for additional cover and concealment.
  • If you are outside when a lockdown is declared, seek shelter away from
  • If a fire alarm is activated during a lockdown, proceed with extreme
  • Do not open the door for people claiming to be public safety personnel unless you have an opportunity to view photo identification or are instructed to do so by a staff member whom you recognize.

External Lockdown External lockdown creates a physical layer of security between the internal and external dimensions of the campus. In addition to locked entrances, this may also include a supervised entry and exit to campus facilities, and/or barricade to campus property (e.g., barricades or chains restricting access to campus parking and grounds). This lockdown allows staff and students to continue activities while maintaining access control to the campus and remain in an elevated state of security.

  • Remain in classroom.
  • Follow faculty and staff instructions
  • Remain attentive to any change in

Shelter in place Sheltering in place procedures are traditionally utilized when:

  1. A tornado has been
  2. There has been a chemical or biological incident outside of, but in proximity to a campus and available information indicates that there is no adequate time to evacuate building occupants to another safe location before the dangerous contaminants reach the
  • Follow staff and faculty
  • Assist people with disabilities if possible
  • If you are outside when a shelter in place is declared, immediately seek an interior room or hallway with no
  • Close windows and doors – do not lock
  • Remain in shelter until an all clear is

Staff and Faculty Must Know – Emergency Information

The campus takes various precautionary measures to protect the students, staff, faculty, and campus visitors. Nevertheless, unavoidable emergencies may occur in extreme situations. Therefore, each campus has a Campus Response Team (CRT) that implements and oversees the campus response to a crisis situation. The CRT receives training in dealing with crisis situations and will primarily direct the immediate response to a crisis situation until the arrival of law enforcement and emergency response personnel. In order to make this program effective, all staff and faculty are expected to familiarize themselves with the following emergency procedures. Nothing herein precludes any student, staff or faculty from contacting the appropriate authorities directly in the event they feel in threat of physical harm or imminent danger.

 Staff and Faculty Emergency Responses

*** In case of emergency: dial 911 ***

  There are a number of different potential situations that may occur that have capability to impact students or staff and faculty. The following possible scenarios are described below with steps to be taken.

  • Emergency evacuation for a fire incident
  • Emergency evacuation for bomb threat or other non-fire situation
  • Emergency lockdown
  • External lockdown
  • Shelter in place

Emergency Evacuation for a Fire Incident

Definition A fire emergency evacuation is initiated when a fire incident occurs. Depending upon the campus size, it may require an evacuation of a single particular building affected by the fire incident, rather than the entire campus. The objective: all building occupants are safely evacuated to a safe distance and location from the building affected, away from fire hydrants, fire lanes, and not under power lines. Staff Response Staff/faculty responsible for the affected areas should conduct a sweep of the building(s) to ensure all students are aware of and appropriately responding to the fire alarm and safely evacuated. Fire evacuation procedures:

  • Evacuation is mandatory when a fire alarm is
  • Designated staff or faculty check the affected building(s) to ensure all personnel are appropriately evacuating.
  • Do not use the
  • Assist people with disabilities if
  • Ensure all doors and windows are closed as a room and building are
  • Do not attempt to reenter the facility unless and until directed to do so by authorized
  • Evacuated persons are directed to a safe distance and location from the building affected, away from fire hydrants, fire lanes, and not under power

Emergency Evacuation for Bomb Threat or Other Non-Fire Situation

Definition Non-fire emergency evacuation is used for any emergency evacuation not related to a fire incident. It is important to remember that evacuation distances significantly expand, up to hundreds of yards, for suspicious object evacuations. Nevertheless, not all bomb threats will necessarily result in evacuation, depending upon the individual event circumstances. The objective: move all campus occupants to a remote, predefined and controlled location. Staff Response Staff members who are designated to sweep evacuation routes and sites should locate a staff member to take responsibility for students under their supervision, and should then sweep the evacuation route and evacuation site for secondary hazards. They should immediately report their findings to the lead administrator.

Note: The lead administrator will typically direct that this step be completed before making the general announcement for evacuation of the building. Other staff:

  1. Gather all students and visitors in your area of responsibility and evacuate using the route and site designated by the lead administrator or
  2. Ensure that all special needs persons are provided assistance by their designees as per the site evacuation
  3. Remain alert to your surroundings. Be particularly alert to any people or conditions that might pose a danger to evacuees. If you encounter a significant hazard, quickly evaluate the situation; adjust your evacuation route and attempt to notify the lead administrator or the appropriate public safety
  4. Once you reach the designated evacuation site, search the site for suspicious objects and adjust accordingly.
  1. On evacuation site – develop a written list of all evacuees and provide the list to the lead administrator or his/her designee. Also indicate the presence or lack of any suspicious objects in your room/work
  2. Supervise students under your
  3. Do not attempt to reenter the facility unless the lead administrator or his/her designee directs you to do

Emergency Lockdown

Definition Emergency Lockdown is used to dramatically and rapidly enhance the level of security in the facility. By locking all exterior, interior and class doors, staff can make it more difficult for dangerous person(s) in the vicinity or in the facility to gain access to staff and students.

Note – locking doors should not eliminate immediate egress possibilities from the facility.

The objective: create as many physical layers of separation between you and the potential aggression. Staff Response:

  1. Make sure entrance points to the building near your location are locked
  2. If you are located in an area with a door that can be locked, gather all students in the vicinity into the room and lock the
  3. Improvise additional door blocking if
  4. Close blinds and cover additional windows, e.g., with a shirt, up-turned table, paper,
  5. Turn off lights in the
  6. If possible, report your status to the lead administrator or designee by telephone or
  7. Do not open the door for people claiming to be public safety personnel unless you have an opportunity to view photo identification or are instructed to do so by a staff member whom you recognize.

Department of Homeland Security:

§  “Active shooter awareness – options for consideration” http://www.dhs.gov/video/options-consideration-active-shooter-training-video

External Lockdown Definition External lockdown creates a physical layer of security between the internal and external dimensions of the campus. By locking all exterior doors and supervising these doors, staff can make it more difficult for a possible external intruder or a potentially dangerous person in the vicinity of the facility to gain access to staff and students. In addition to locked entrances and supervised entry and exit to campus facilities, this step may include barricades to campus property (e.g., barricades or chains restricting access to campus parking lots and grounds). This lockdown allows staff and students to continue with productive activities while maintaining access control to the facility.

Objective: create a physical layer of security between the external environment and internal campus operation while elevating the overall level of security. Staff Response:

  1. Make sure the designated entrance points to the building near your location are locked immediately.
  2. If you are in an external classroom to the main building move students to alternative internal classrooms.
  3. If possible, report your status to the lead administrator or designee by telephone or
  4. Continue with normal activities as much as the situation
  5. If students or staff have a need to move about in the building, obtain permission first from the lead administrator or
  6. Be prepared to rapidly implement an emergency evacuation or emergency lockdown – if directed to do so or if circumstances indicate you should do so

Shelter in Place

Definition Sheltering in place procedures are traditionally utilized when:

  1. A tornado has been
  2. There has been a chemical or biological incident outside of, but in proximity to, a facility and available information indicates that there is no adequate time to evacuate building occupants to another safe location before the dangerous contaminants reach the

Objective: seek immediate shelter away from doors and windows and remain there during an emergency Staff Response:

  1. All staff that is outdoors should quickly gather all students and adults in the area and instruct them to go inside the facility immediately. Once inside, if possible instruct everyone to move to an interior area without windows and
  2. Close all windows and
  3. In chemical spills / biological incident – if available, use tape to cover all windows and doors with sheets of plastic to help reduce airflow into the area. Wet towels can be used to reduce airflow under doors. Close all outside air vents. Turn off all heating or ventilation systems. Use damp towels or cloths to cover any openings in walls or doors. Tape can also be used to cover any cracks, crevices, electrical outlets, cable television connections or other openings that might allow air to flow into the shelter
  4. Listen to local radio or television news for instructions from emergency management and public safety
  5. Review emergency evacuation protocols

The OPE Campus Security Website can be accessed at http://ope.ed.gov/security

Criminal Offense 2014 2015 2016
Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter  0  0 0
Negligent manslaughter  0  0  0
Rape  0 0 0
Fondling  0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0
Statutory rape 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0

 

Criminal Offenses – Public Property
Criminal Offense
2014 2015 2016
Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter  0  0  0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0
Statutory rape 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0
Aggravated assault 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0
Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0

DESCRIPTION OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION PROGRAMS

 Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute publishes and distributes annually to all current students and     employees a copy of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program. Below are the details related to this topic.

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention

Drug abuse affects all aspects of American life. It threatens the workplace, our homes, our schools and our community. The U.S. Department of Education requires institutions of higher education to implement a drug prevention and awareness program for their students and employees through the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. All students are expected to conduct themselves as mature adults and as members of an academic community. The consumption of alcohol or drugs while attending class is prohibited and may be subject to disciplinary action.

Standards of Conduct

The School community must adhere to a code of conduct that recognizes that the unlawful manufacture, sale, delivery, unauthorized possession or use of any illicit drug is prohibited on property owned or otherwise controlled by Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute. If an individual associated with the School is apprehended for violating any drug-or alcohol-related law when on School property, or participating in a School activity, the School will fully cooperate with all law enforcement agencies. Underage possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the School and the state laws will be enforced. Intentionally or knowingly selling, or intentionally or knowingly furnishing alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21, or to persons obviously inebriated, is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the School.

Health Risks Associated with the use of Illicit Drugs and the Abuse of Alcohol

Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions and the loss of memory. High doses of alcohol can cause respiratory depression and death. Long-term consumption, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to dependence and permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Physical effects of drugs include increased heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and throat, and increased appetite. The use of drugs may impair or reduce short-term memory and comprehension, alter sense of time, and reduce the ability to perform tasks requiring concentration and coordination. Motivation and cognition may also be altered making the acquisition of new information difficult. As one can see from the above, there are major health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol.

Federal Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Violations

Federal guidelines focus strongly on illicit drug use and distribution. The Higher Education Opportunity Act   states students convicted of an illicit drug violation can be denied federal financial aid for a specific period, in addition to other legal penalties. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) asks students if they have been convicted of a drug-related offense: “Have you ever been convicted of possessing or selling illegal drugs?” Failure to answer the question automatically disqualifies students from receiving federal financial aid. Answering this question falsely could result in fines up to $20,000, imprisonment or both

Penalties for Drug Convictions

If the student was convicted of both possessing and selling drugs, and the periods of ineligibility are different, the student will be ineligible for the longer period.

Possession of Illegal Drugs

    • For a first offense, a student loses eligibility for federal financial aid for one year from the date of
    • For a second offense, a student loses eligibility for federal financial aid for two years from the date of
  • For a third offense and subsequent offenses, a student has indefinite ineligibility for federal financial aid from the date of

Sale of Illegal Drugs

  • For a first offense, a student loses eligibility for federal financial aid for two years from the date of
  • For a second offense and subsequent offenses, a student has indefinite ineligibility from the date of

Some other potential federal penalties and sanctions applicable to drug-related offenses include: 21 U.S.C. 844 1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000, or both. After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and fined at least $2,500, or both. After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years and fined at least $5, or both. Provisions relating to increased penalties in cases of certain serious crack possession offenses, making offenders subject to fines under Title 18 or imprisonment to terms not less than 5 years and no more than 20 years, or both. Possession of flunitrazepam shall be imprisoned for not more than 3 years, shall be fined as otherwise provided in this section, or both after mixture or substance exceeds 1 gram.

21 U. S. C. 844a Civil fine up to $10,000

21 U. S. C. 847 Additional Penalties Any penalty imposed for violation of this subchapter shall be in addition to, and not in lieu of, any civil or administrative penalty or sanction authorized by law.

21 U. S. C. 854 Investment of illicit drug profits Whoever violates this section shall be fined no more than $50,000 or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both.

21 U. S. C. 862

  1. Drug Traffickers – Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to 5 years for the first offense, up to 10 years for second and permanently ineligible for subsequent
  2. Drug Possessors – 1st offense is up to 1 year and 2nd and subsequent offenses are up to 5
  3. Suspension of period of ineligibility (A) (B) (C) 21 U. S. C. 862a

Denial of assistance and benefits for certain drug related convictions, i.e., state program funded under the Social Security Act or food stamp program or state program under the Food Stamp Act. More information about federal penalties and sanctions for unlawful possession, use, sale, and/or distribution of controlled substances is located at http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/21cfr/21usc/ index.html

Steps to Regain Federal Student Aid Eligibility

  1. A student can regain eligibility for federal student aid funds the day after the period of ineligibility ends or upon having a conviction reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale of illegal drugs or three convictions for possession remain on the record. In such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains
  2. A student may also regain eligibility upon successful completion of a qualified drug rehabilitation program that must:
    • Include the student passing at least two unannounced drug tests; AND
    • Have received or is qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly under a federal, state or local government program, or
    • Be administered by a federal, state, or local government agency or court, or
    • Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state-licensed insurance company, or
    • Be administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic, or medical doctor.
  3. A student may further regain eligibility upon successful completion of two unannounced drug tests which are part of an approved rehab program (the student does not need to complete the rest of the program).

The student is responsible to certify that a rehabilitation program was successfully completed. As with the conviction question on the FAFSA, the School is not required to confirm the reported information unless conflicting information is determined.

Convictions during Enrollment

Federal regulations require enrolled students convicted of a drug offense after receiving federal financial aid to notify Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute immediately. The student will then become ineligible for further federal financial aid and must repay federal financial aid received after the conviction.

Drug and Alcohol Counseling

Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute maintains records of organizations that can be of assistance with Drug and Alcohol Counseling. Please see the Director for these resources.

Institutional Sanctions for Alcohol and Drug Violations

Any member of the School community found consuming or selling drugs on School property shall be subject to discipline on a case-by-case basis.

  • Discipline will be based on the seriousness of the
  • A case may result in dismissal from the
  • In all cases, the School will abide by local, state and federal sanctions regarding unlawful possession of drugs and the consumption of
  • Additional state penalties and sanctions may also
  • The School has adopted a zero-tolerance policy regarding underage
  • Successful completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program by an individual confirmed to have been in violation of alcohol or drug policies and/or laws who has since sought admission or readmission to the school will be considered on a case-by-case

Biennial Review of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

Schools are required to conduct a biennial review of their drug and alcohol abuse prevention program. This review must include a determination of the number of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on the institution’s campus or as part of the institution’s activities and the number and type of sanctions imposed by the institution as a result of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on the institution’s campus or as part of the institution’s activities. The term “campus” is defined in the same manner as it is defined for campus safety reporting purposes. That is, the term campus encompasses any building or property owned or controlled by the school within a reasonably contiguous geographic area used in direct support of the school’s educational purposes or used by students and supporting institutional purposes. The effectiveness of Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute’s prevention program is, in part, also measured by tracking the number of drug and alcohol-related

  • disciplinary actions,
  • treatment referrals, and
  • incidents recorded by campus

Additionally, to assist in the determination of the effectiveness of Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute’s prevention program, the school considers, if and when the school is made aware, the number of students or employees attending self-help or other counseling groups related to alcohol or drug abuse.  The school also conducts a survey to ascertain student, faculty, and employee attitudes and perceptions about whether there is a drug and alcohol problem on campus. With the results gathered from the various points of information described above, the school writes its report giving the results of the biennial review and its determination of whether the program is being effective or must be modified. The school keeps the biennial review on file in case of a possible audit. Schools are not required to send their review to the U.S. Department of Education unless requested to do so. Long Island Nail Skin & Hair Institute conducts its biennial review every other year. The report from the review and documents related to it are retained for three years after the fiscal year in which the report was created.